Why does my child have poor handwriting?

Next on the list is the Palmar Reflex! This reflex is seen in infancy when a child grasps your finger! It usually is integrated into normal movement by 5 or 6 months of age. 

Everyone has seen a child who, while practicing cutting with scissors or playing piano, sticks their tongue out because they are concentrating. What's really happening though is that the Palmar Reflex has not integrated! This reflex literally connects the hand and mouth, so when it sticks around into childhood, it can look pretty funny! This reflex must be integrated in order for children to be successful with the "pincer grasp", which is the ability to pick up objects with just your thumb and index finger. If not integrated, it will also impact pencil grip. Children diagnosed with dysgraphia or who have a strange pencil grip likely have a retained Palmar Reflex! They struggle with manual dexterity, have labored and messy handwriting, and may have articulation issues as well. 

It's so important to integrate this reflex! By doing so children are able to write neatly and with ease, use fine motor skills, and even speech clearly and efficiently! 

Check out this video for more information about symptoms of a retained Palmar Reflex.

Check out our workshops to learn how to integrate primitive reflexes!